Paediatricians, health visitors and GPs have joined forces to produce guidance for parents who are worried about their new baby.

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has joined forces with the British Association of Perinatal Medicine (BAPM – part of the RCPCH), the Institute of Health Visiting (iHV), and the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) to produce a ‘fridge’ poster which signposts when and where parents should seek help for babies aged three months and under.

Over the summer, paediatricians reported that a small number of children may have become seriously ill because of delays in accessing health services*.  Health professionals are concerned that such delays could happen again this winter as some paediatricians are reporting seeing far fewer children than they would have expected.

Parents may not know they are still able to have face-to-face consultations, may find it difficult to get an appointment quickly when worried, or may be concerned about COVID transmission.  Added to this, new parents in some parts of the country have not had the usual access to health visitors (many of whom were redeployed into other roles during the pandemic), and lockdowns have meant some have not been able to see their extended families, friends and other parents.

Dr Helen Mactier, President of BAPM, said:

“Being a new parent can be daunting at any time, but having a new baby during a pandemic can throw up a lot of additional challenges for many families – even more so under lockdown.

“Many parents haven’t had the usual access to routine face-to-face appointments with a healthcare professional or been able to discuss a change in their baby’s appearance or behaviour with other new parents or their own friends and family. That can be really worrying.

“We want to let parents know what should or shouldn’t be of concern with regard to their baby’s health, and to put their minds at rest that the NHS is here for them if their baby is unwell.”

Dr Cheryll Adams, Executive Director of the Institute of Health Visiting, said:

“We’re delighted to support the publication of these new information posters and will be distributing them widely to health visitors and parents.  COVID-19 has shone a light on the challenges for new parents who may not be sure whether a change of behaviour or appearance in their new baby suggests that they are unwell.  These posters make clear when they should seek help which will be very reassuring.”

Professor Martin Marshall, Chair of the Royal College of GPs, said:

“Children rarely become ill with COVID-19 but there are other conditions which can be serious if left untreated.  We want parents of young children to seek medical help when they are concerned about the health of their child – and to know that despite lockdown restrictions, general practice services are available, although they might be delivered in a different way than usual. Where necessary, face-to-face appointments will be facilitated in as safe a way as possible. This guidance will help people to decide when they should get help as well as when they don’t need to worry.”

*https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2020/11/02/archdischild-2020-320565

   https://adc.bmj.com/content/early/2020/06/24/archdischild-2020-319848

We are delighted that one of our members, Janine McKnight-Cowan, won the RCN Community and General Practice Nursing Award at last night’s RCN awards.

Janine, from Derbyshire Community Health Services NHS Foundation Trust, won the award for developing a tool to help health visitors explain to new mothers who’ve had a C-section as to why it’s important to take it easy.

She also presented her Five Guide for health visitors enhancing C-Section recovery on a poster at our evidence-based practice conference in May this year

As Janine says:

‘Five guide is so simple. For every lady who has a caesarean this has to be communicated. It is transferable for all health visitors, midwives and others. I now want to get this out as a national standard.’

Many congratulations Janine!

 

 

The iHV is delighted to offer you an opportunity to showcase your work in Perinatal and Infant Mental Health (PIMH) at the iHV National Multi-agency Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Conference: The hidden challenges, being held in Manchester on 24 April 2018.  Please see programme.

As well as stimulating learning through debate and discussion via presentations from internationally-acclaimed speakers, the day will offer focused opportunities to learn from each other through sharing best and promising practice in PIMH.

Abstract Submission and Timeline

Abstracts are welcome in areas of new research and local innovations in the fields of perinatal and/or infant mental health. The abstract should be no more than 250 words and provide an overview clearly demonstrating excellence, innovation and novel approaches to improve outcomes in perinatal and/or infant mental health.

Please submit your abstract as a Microsoft Word document to [email protected].

  • Tue 13 March 2018 – Abstract submission deadline
  • 14 – 26 March – iHV peer-review process on submissions
  • Tue 27 March 2018 – participants informed of acceptance of abstracts for a poster.  Full guidance on the poster format will be provided if your abstract is successful.
  • Tue 10 April 2018 – Poster deadline for conference
  • Tue 24 April 2018 – Poster presentations at the iHV National Multi-agency Perinatal and Infant Mental Health Conference: The hidden challenges in Manchester

It is important that you book to secure your conference place on or before the final registration deadline for accepting your offer to present.

Early bird tickets (for iHV Champions, iHV members and non-members) are available until 29 March 2018, so don’t miss them!

The Institute of Health Visiting (iHV) is attending and presenting at the International Marcé Society Biennial Scientific Meeting being held this week (26-28 September) in Melbourne, Australia, with the theme Frontiers in Perinatal Mental Health – looking to the future.

Dr Cheryll Adams CBE., Executive Director, iHV, said:

“The iHV is delighted to attend the International Marcé conference, where we can share best practice on our Perinatal Mental Health (PMH) Champions training and also learn about what works well in other countries. By 2016, a total of 577 PMH champions have been trained across England and they, in turn, have rolled out the training to in excess of 10,000 health visitors and others.”

Dr Adams continued:

“Whilst our iHV training was designed for health visitors, many other professions have benefitted during the roll out including midwives, general practitioners and mental health workers. As a result, the iHV has now designed and delivered multi-professional champions training and a range of direct delivery training. As encouraging as the reach, has been the many effects of the training on service transformation at a local, regional and national level.”

Melita Walker, Professional Development Officer/ Perinatal Mental Health Lead at the Institute of Health Visiting, is presenting her poster on the iHV’s Health Visitor Perinatal Mental Health Training – changing practice and systems together.

 

Melita Walker, Professional Development Officer/ Perinatal Mental Health Lead at the Institute of Health Visiting, presenting her poster at the International Marcé Society Biennial Scientific Meeting in Melbourne, Australia.

Melita Walker, Professional Development Officer/ Perinatal Mental Health Lead at the Institute of Health Visiting, presenting her poster at the International Marcé Society Biennial Scientific Meeting in Melbourne, Australia.

Public Health England has recently published new posters and leaflets designed to raise awareness of measles in young people and healthcare workers. The attached document outlines each of the three resources.

via Photo Bucket http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w497/updatesforhealth/Measles%20ndash%20Rubeola_zpsf9de4z47.jpg

via Photo Bucket http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w497/updatesforhealth/Measles%20ndash%20Rubeola_zpsf9de4z47.jpg