The Government is seeking views on their green paper about the changes they want to make to the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) and alternative provision (AP) system in England.

The Government commissioned the SEND Review in September 2019 as a response to the widespread recognition that the system was failing to deliver improved outcomes for children and young people and that parental and provider confidence was in decline. The SEND review green paper sets out the Government’s proposals for a system that offers children and young people the opportunity to thrive, with access to the right support, in the right place, and at the right time, so they can fulfil their potential and lead happy, healthy and productive adult lives.

The SEND Review highlights key areas for the case for change:

  • Children and Young People with SEND and those in alternative provision have consistently poorer outcomes than their peers
  • Experiences of the SEND and AP provision system are negative
  • The SEND and AP system is financially unsustainable
  • There is too much inconsistency across the SEND system in how and where needs are assessed and met
  • A vicious circle is driving these challenges

The Government has opened a consultation to improve outcomes for children and young people in England with SEND and those in alternative provision.

To achieve this ambition, the Government wants to work with and hear from:

  • children and young people
  • parents and carers
  • those who advocate and work with the SEND sector
  • local and national system leaders

We have 13 weeks to get this right, so please consider the proposals set out in the Government’s  green paper and respond to their consultation.

Together, we can ensure that every child and young person with SEND and those in alternative provision can thrive and be well prepared for adult life.

iHV is collating a response to this consultation – please contact us (via email to [email protected] by 10 June 2022) if you have comments that you would like us to consider as part of our submission.

This consultation closes at 11:45pm on 1 July 2022.
If you have comments that you would like iHV to consider as part of our submission, please send via email to [email protected] by 10 June 2022


  • A separate summary covering the SEND and AP green paper and responding to the consultation is also available.
  • A British Sign Language (BSL) version and an easy-read version of the green paper will be available in early April.
  • If you would like a Braille or audio version of the green paper or an accessible format that is not listed, email [email protected].

 

iHV publishes its response to the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) online consultation on Draft standards for post-registration nursing including Specialist Community Public Health Nursing – health visiting.

We welcome the development of proficiencies specific to the three SCPHN fields of health visiting, school nursing and occupational health nursing. We believe that this is an important strengthening of the regulatory status of health visiting so that the public can have assurances of what can be expected of a SCPHN health visitor. We also set out some additional recommendations for enhancements of the draft proficiencies themselves.

We believe that the proposed new standards provide a timely opportunity to re-envision health visiting and Specialist Community Public Health Nursing. We are committed to build on the strength of evidence in support of the vital contribution SCPHN health visitors make to improving the health and life chances of people across the life-course from its earliest days in their families, communities where they live, learn and work at a time of widening inequalities and persistent as well as new public health challenges.

We strongly encourage all health visitors and others with an interest in child and family public health to take the opportunity to make their own responses to the NMC consultation and we hope that, by publishing our response, this will assist health visitors and others to consider their own responses to the consultation. The closing date for responses to the consultation is 2 August 2021.

Please also see our Voices Blog on ‘Future Health Visiting – summarising the key issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Originally published 1 July 2021

Joint letters from the Institute of Health Visiting (iHV) and the School and Public Health Nurses Association (SAPHNA) warn national and local leaders that the proposed cuts to health visiting and school nursing services in Hampshire will put children at risk of harm.

Despite rising levels of safeguarding concerns nationally which saw 285 children killed or seriously harmed in the first 6 months of lockdown in England, Hampshire County Council has forged ahead with their plans to cut their health visiting and school nursing services intended to support families and safeguard children.

Concerns have been raised that the proposals described as “Serving Hampshire, balancing the budget” bear no resemblance to the national Healthy Child Programme which sets out a programme of support for all babies, children, and their families. Within the proposed plans to reduce the 0-19 Public Health Nursing Service budget by £2.09 million per year are significant elements that will undermine delivery of the Healthy Child Programme, drastically cut the support available to families, and strip out the mechanism to identify vulnerable children:

  • cutting approximately 47 staff posts (12.5% of the current workforce);
  • for children 0-5 years, all children will only receive one mandated face-to-face health review. All other reviews will be risk assessed to decide whether they should be completed face-to-face, by video or by telephone”;
  • only providing school nurse support to children and young people over the age of 11 years through the digital offer’, i.e. NO face-to-face service;
  • minimal school nursing statutory involvement in safeguarding and child protection.

The whole health and social care system is interconnected and changes like these cannot be made in isolation without consideration of the wider system impact; making radical cuts like these will cause harm to children and will create a ripple effect across other services like GPs, secondary care, and children’s social care that are already stretched and need to be accounted for.

The iHV and SAPHNA believe there are several sets of grounds which, singly and severally, mean the County Council and national government ought to review these plans, to ensure that they are not in breach of their statutory safeguarding responsibilities nor undermine the delivery of the Healthy Child Programme which has been mandated by government.

Post-covid, it is even more important that families with babies and children are supported, with rising levels of children living with vulnerability and risk. England already has a significant problem, with 1/3 of all vulnerable children recognised as ‘invisible’ [1] within the system and therefore not receiving the support that they need. Our children are also the unhappiest across Europe. This proposed model would place them at even greater risk

These cuts are the predicted consequences of insufficient funding and inadequate system levers, alongside a lack of prioritisation of prevention and early intervention at all levels. An urgent national review is needed to acknowledge the root cause of these cuts, and their significant wider system impacts, with a clear plan to tackle them once and for all.

Sharon White, CEO SAPHNA, said:

“We have seen a number of recent and significant cuts to health visiting and school nursing services with more planned; this must stop. We are fully versed in the Governments budget cuts, reduced public health grant and cash-strapped councils with our services clearly seen as ‘easy pickings’ in trying to rectify; this false economy as only serves to kick the can down the road, resulting in increased costs to services to say nothing of the long-term impacts on children’s and families’ lives.

We have more than enough evidence to demonstrate that our public health practice can and does make a vital difference. Hampshire’s proposals are radical, dangerous and a disservice to its population. We cannot and must not accept this.”

 Alison Morton, Executive Director at the Institute of Health Visiting, said:

“We should all be worried about what’s happening in Hampshire. The proposed changes in Hampshire represent an important national test case, rather than an isolated outlier that only needs to be addressed locally. The national Government’s response is that it’s down to local authorities to decide how they manage their budgets. Conversely, the local authorities’ perspective is that the cuts are due to a lack of government funding. Both are true – and the time has come to move beyond this stalemate and find a sustainable solution that puts babies, children, and their families first. Unless resolved, families ultimately bear the brunt of these cuts.”


The council is seeking residents’ and stakeholders’ views on their proposals through an open consultation process. We urge as many people as possible to “have your say” by responding to this consultation. The consultation Information Pack provides further detail about Public Health services in Hampshire, the four areas under consideration and the options for change – available here.

The iHV response: Since the consultation was launched, the iHV has been working constructively and in collaboration with the School and Public Health Nurses Association, the unions, and colleagues in Hampshire County Council to find a resolution that meets the needs of babies, children, and their families. At the end of last week, the iHV and SAPHNA sent a joint letter to both Hampshire County Council and Public Health England outlining their concerns.

Serious Incident Notifications: The total number of serious incident notifications for children during the first half of 2020-21 increased by 27% (n=285) on the same period in 2019-20 – of these, 35.8% relate to under 1s who remain at the highest risk of homicide than any other age group[2].

[1] https://www.childrenscommissioner.gov.uk/report/childhood-vulnerability-in-england-2019/

2 BETA: .GOV.UK (2021) Part 1 (April to September) 2020-21. Serious incident notifications  https://explore-education-statistics.service.gov.uk/find-statistics/serious-incident-notifications

 

 

Last week the NMC launched its consultation on draft standards for community and specialist community public health nursing (SCPHN). These set the expectations of future health visitors along with school nurses and occupational health nursing. The new NMC standards offer the opportunity to build on the advances in the evidence base for universal child and family health visiting for the pressing public health challenges of our times. It is vitally important that the views of health visitors are heard and shape these new standards.

The NMC is providing opportunities to be informed of the issues, to ask questions and to take part in the consultation. We encourage all health visitors to take up these opportunities.

iHV members can also shape the iHV’s response by joining us at our forthcoming iHV networking events for members which will focus on the NMC consultation:


iHV Student Networking Event – Future health visiting: Next steps for me and the profession

21 May 2021 (for student health visitor iHV members only) 

In our first “iHV Student Networking Event” on 21 May, we will explore the crucial first year and preceptorship; and we will share views on the draft NMC standards for the Future SCPHN-health visiting.

Your experiences matter and  will help us to formulate our response to the NMC’s consultation on the proposed standards. We have invited a short input from the NMC as well as from a practitioner with recent experience of preceptorship.

This webinar is for iHV Student Members ONLY. To book on, you will need your iHV membership number to access the tickets.


Practice Education Networking Event – Future health visiting: Next steps for the profession

16 June 2021 (open to all iHV members)

In our second “Practice Education Networking Event” on 16 June, we extend a wide invitation to all our iHV members who have an interest in education and standards for future health visitors. This too will help us to formulate our response to the NMC’s consultation on the proposed standards and we have invited a short input from the NMC as well as from a current Lead Practice Teacher / Assessor – health visitor.

This webinar is for iHV Members ONLY. To book on, you will need your iHV membership number to access the tickets.


Where can I find more information on the consultation?

We encourage all health visitors (whether you are an iHV member or not) to take the time to read the NMC consultation documents.

The new standards are intended to equip future health visitors to meet the public health needs of the future.

The four principles of health visiting formulated in 1977, and later included in current standards of proficiency for SCPHN have stood the test of time. Now is the time to consider whether the draft standards:

  • Provide a compelling vision for the future of health visiting across the four nations of the UK;
  • Proposed six ‘spheres of influence’ are pitched at the right level and are relevant to emerging health needs and the evidence base for practice;
  • ‘Field-specific’ proficiencies for health visiting capture the distinctive knowledge, skills and attributes required for future health visitors;
  • Will command the support of the profession; and
  • Will help service users and employers to know what can be expected of the SCPHN health visitor.

 

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has launched their public consultation for specialist community public health nursing (SCPHN) standards – building on ambitions for community and public health nursing.

The new NMC standards offer the opportunity to build on the advances in the evidence base for universal child and family health visiting for the pressing public health challenges of our times. It is vitally important that the views of health visitors are heard and shape these new standards.

We will be responding from the iHV – as well as submitting your own response, look out for our mailings on ways that you can help shape the iHV’s response.

 

The standards, for specialist community public health nursing (SCPHN) and specialist practice qualifications (SPQs), will equip the next generation of community and public health nurses working in health and social care with the right proficiencies to care for people in a rapidly changing world.

These essential education standards were last updated over 15 years ago. But we need fit for purpose standards that reflect the realities of modern nursing in health and social care now

These draft standards, which have been co-produced with subject experts, will provide the right proficiencies these professionals need to support and care for people in a rapidly changing world.

The consultation will run until Monday 2 August 2021. Normally these NMC consultations run for 12 weeks but they’ve extended this one to more than 16 weeks to give you and your colleagues more time to take part given the continued pressures on services caused by the pandemic.

A new consultation, from Department of Health and Social Care and Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport, has been launched on proposals to ban online adverts for foods high in fat, sugar and salt in the UK to tackle the obesity crisis and get the nation fit and healthy.

  • Proposal to ban online adverts promoting food high in fat, sugar and salt.
  • Ban would help protect children from developing long-term unhealthy eating habits.
  • Part of government’s landmark obesity strategy to help everyone live healthier lives.

Research shows children are exposed to over 15 billion adverts for products high in fat, sugar and salt (HFSS) online every year.

Evidence shows that exposure to HFSS advertising can affect what children eat and when they eat, both in the short term by increasing the amount of food children eat immediately after being exposed to an advert, and by shaping longer-term food preferences from a young age.

The new consultation, which will run for 6 weeks, will gather views from the public and industry stakeholders to understand the impact and challenges of introducing a total ban on the advertising of these products online, to help people live healthier lives and tackle childhood obesity.

The Early Years healthy development questionnaire has been extended by one week to help capture a wide range of responses. The new closing date is 11:59pm on Friday 23 October.

The Prime Minister has asked Rt Hon Andrea Leadsom MP to lead a new review into improving health and development outcomes of babies and young children in England. The time from conception to the age of 2 is a critical time for development and can impact physical health, mental health and opportunity throughout life.

They’d like to hear from recent parents, including those who gave birth during the lockdown and public health response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, about the experiences of care and services you received.

They’d also like to hear from health service professionals, charities, volunteer groups and academics.

They will use your views to check where progress has been made and where more needs to be done in the future both locally and nationally.

The questionnaire has been extended by one week to help capture a wide range of responses. The new closing date is 11:59pm on Friday 23 October.

The Prime Minister has asked Rt Hon Andrea Leadsom MP to lead a new review into improving health and development outcomes of babies and young children in England. The time from conception to the age of 2 is a critical time for development and can impact physical health, mental health and opportunity throughout life.

The consultation would like to hear from recent parents, including those who gave birth during the lockdown, and public health response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, about the experiences of care and services you received.

They’d also like to hear from health service professionals, charities, volunteer groups and academics.

Your views can help to shape the outcome of the review – please use this opportunity and share to others to respond too.

The closing date for responses is 11:59pm on Friday 16 October 2020.

Public Health England (PHE) is conducting an evidence review on social prescribing approaches for migrant populations in England in collaboration with University College London (UCL) and International Organization for Migration (IOM).

Social prescribing is a major component of the NHS England Long Term Plan and Universal Personalised Care. It is defined by the NHS as a method by which referrals from primary care professionals and local agencies, as well as self-referrals, are made to link workers, who in turn connect individuals with community, voluntary, statutory and other sector services intended to improve holistic health and wellbeing.

Social prescribing models can include:

  • direct referrals from primary health care, social care or local agencies made to link workers, facilitators, coordinators and navigators in the UK, who in turn assist individuals in reaching services and activities
  • self-referral to link workers, facilitators, coordinators and navigators in the UK, who in turn assist individuals in reaching services and activities
  • signposting from health care, social care or local agencies to services and activities

They would like:

  • information published between 1 January 2000 and 1 May 2020
  • unpublished information related to research carried out between 1 January 2000 and 1 May 2020, including any ongoing research
  • reports that summarise or collate migrants’ lived experiences, for example, organisational reports or internal evaluations of projects or services (the views, experiences and opinions of individual professionals, researchers, commentators or patients will not be included, however)

They are especially interested in the following outcomes for key area 2:

  • improved self-esteem and confidence
  • greater sense of control and empowerment
  • reduction in symptoms of anxiety and depression
  • improved knowledge and skills
  • improved social connectivity

This consultation closes at

The draft Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder quality standard consultation period is now open.

Please submit your comments on the form listed on the website and ensure all relevant fields are completed.

Responses must be submitted to [email protected] by 5pm on FRIDAY 3 APRIL 2020.

Following consultation the comments will be considered by the quality standards advisory committee (QSAC) and a record of this summarised in the QSAC meeting minutes. Registered stakeholders that submitted comments will be sent a link to the QSAC meeting minutes on the NICE website when the final quality standard publishes so that they may see how their comments were considered by the committee during the meeting.

Comments received from non-registered organisations and individuals are not summarised in the formal report presented to the committee but are included as an appendix. These comments are not made available on the NICE website. However, if they result in changes to the quality standard this is recorded in the committee meeting minutes.