Would you like to share your practice developments or research at our 2022 annual evidence-based practice (EBP) conference – “Together | Fairer | Stronger” on 15 September 2022 at King’s House Conference Centre in Manchester?

If so, we would love to hear from you! The EBP conference will be a fabulous event for you to showcase your work whilst sharing learning and innovations in practice.

We welcome submissions that support the overall theme of reducing health inequalities and strengthening integrated working from researchers, and educators. We know that many practitioners are also leading innovative improvement projects in practice, and we want to provide an opportunity for you to showcase and disseminate your findings to a wider audience.

We are keen to showcase best practice examples of effective integrated working and would also be especially delighted to receive applications from community nursery nurses and other health visiting associate practitioners. Non-UK applicants will also be considered if their work can demonstrate transferable learning.

Why should I submit an abstract?

  • To showcase your work, disseminate your findings to a national audience and raise the profile of your organisation
  • To enhance research in health visiting
  • To inform others about positive, innovative approaches to improve evidence-based practice in health visiting and preventative public health work focused on families with babies and young children
  • To raise the profile and benefits of an effective health visiting service focused on reducing health inequalities

Abstract/conference themes:

We are inviting abstracts that support the overall theme of the conference: Reducing health inequalities and strengthening integrated working:

  • Improving access/ reducing inequalities: We are particularly interested in submissions that improve the experience and outcomes of health visiting service users who encounter obstacles accessing health care, and/ or people with protected characteristics, for example: people from minoritised ethnic groups; people with disabilities; LGBTQI+ women and people; families experiencing homelessness; domestic abuse; substance misuse problems; mental illness and mental health problems; and safeguarding.
  • Integration: Innovations in health visiting practice or service delivery models from across the UK that can demonstrate impact within integrated/ ‘whole system’ public health approaches to addressing health inequalities.
  • Themes may also include, but are not limited to current priority public health topics:
    • Transition to parenthood, including preconception care
    • Breastfeeding
    • Perinatal mental health (mothers, fathers, and partners)
    • Infant and child mental health
    • Healthy nutrition, physical activity, and healthy weight
    • Managing minor illnesses, building health literacy and prevention of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)
    • Reducing unintentional injuries
    • The uptake of immunisations
    • Primary prevention and health promotion in oral health
    • Child development 0-5 years, including speech, language and communication and school readiness
    • Sleep
    • Children with developmental disorders, disabilities, and complex health needs
    • Tobacco, alcohol, and substance misuse in the perinatal period
    • Healthy couple relationships
    • Teenage parenthood

Abstract Submissions

The abstract submission deadline is 4 April 2022.

Please see Abstract Submission Guidelines and Timeline for further details on format and how to submit.

We are very excited that our EBP conference will be face to face. It will provide a great opportunity to showcase local work and network with colleagues and national experts from across the country. It really is a conference that can’t be missed!

Our Booking system is due to go live on 11 March so, in the meantime, please hold the conference date in your diary – 15 September 2022 at King’s House Conference Centre in Manchester.

 

 

 

Charity collective, Best Beginnings, Home-Start UK and the Parent-Infant Foundation, publish a new report sharing families’ experiences of lockdown during pregnancy or with a baby.

Babies in Lockdown: listening to parents to build back better (2020), based on a survey of over 5000 families, highlights the chronic under resourcing of services for families, the inequalities in babies’ early experiences and its worsening forecast due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The report warns that many families with lower incomes, young parents and those from Black, Asian and minority ethnic communities, will have been hit hardest by the pandemic. The Babies in Lockdown Report shines a light on UK baby inequalities as charities call on Government to act now to avoid a “Post-COVID19 lottery”.

Dr Cheryll Adams CBE, Executive Director iHV, commented:

“The iHV welcomes this excellent report which lays bare just how challenging it has been for many parents during lockdown. It was distressing to read their stories and, in particular, how the most disadvantaged have felt the hardest impact of lockdown and lack of support. It is important that we listen to the voice of these parents and ensure that we are better prepared to meet the needs of young children and their families as the pandemic continues. We support the report title, we now need to build back better for infants and their families and this will include ensuring that all families receive support from the health visiting service during this crucial stage of their parenting journey”.

The report tells us that:

  • COVID-19 has affected parents, babies and the services that support them in diverse ways.
  • Families already at risk of poor outcomes have suffered the most.
  • Without action, the pandemic could cast a long shadow on the lives of some babies.

The Babies in Lockdown: listening to parents to build back better (2020) report makes three policy calls for the UK Government:

  • A one-off Baby Boost to enable local services to support families who have had a baby during or close to lockdown.
  • A new Parent-Infant Premium providing new funding for local commissioners, targeted at improving outcomes for the most vulnerable children.
  • Significant and sustained investment in core funding to support families from conception to age two and beyond, including in statutory services, charities and community groups.

The iHV welcomes and supports the call from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and Children Poverty Action Group (CPAG) on the next UK Government to take urgent action on poverty to ensure a healthier future for the UK’s infants, children and young people.

Poverty and low income is seriously affecting the health of UK children according to paediatricians – and any new Government must tackle health inequalities or risk storing up health problems for future generations. That’s according to a new report from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and Child Poverty Action Group (CPAG) launched today.

The report “Poverty and child health: views from the frontline” is based on a survey of more than 250 paediatricians across the country, whose comments provide an insight into the grave reality of life for the millions of UK children living in poverty.

Latest figures show that 30% (4 million) children in the UK live in poverty – with projections suggesting this could rise to 5 million by the end of the decade.

Dr Cheryll Adams CBE, executive director, iHV, commented:

“The iHV welcomes and supports the call from the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) and Children Poverty Action Group (CPAG) on the next UK Government to take urgent action on poverty to ensure a healthier future for the UK’s infants, children and young people.

We particularly welcome the call to reverse public health cuts to ensure universal early years services, including health visiting and school nursing, are prioritised and supported financially, with additional targeted help for children and families experiencing poverty.  The recent reduction in health visitor numbers impacts the vital support that babies, young children and families need at such a critical time in their lives – we want to ensure that every child has the best start in life.”

The report looks at a number of areas including food insecurity, poor housing and worry, stress and stigma – and their effect on the health of children.  It reveals that:

  • More than two-thirds of paediatricians surveyed said poverty and low income contribute ‘very much’ to the ill health of children they work with
  • Housing problems or homelessness were a concern for two thirds of respondents.
  • More than 60% said food insecurity contributed to the ill health amongst children they treat 3
  • 40% had difficulty discharging a child in the last 6 months because of concerns about housing or food insecurity
  • More than 50% of respondents said that financial stress and worry contribute ‘very much’ to the ill health of children they work with

The RCPCH and CPAG are calling on whoever forms the next Government to tackle poverty urgently through:

  • The restoration of binding national targets to reduce child poverty, backed by a national child poverty strategy.
  • The adoption of a ‘child health in all policies’ approach to decision making and policy development, with Her Majesty’s Treasury disclosing information about the impact of the Chancellor’s annual budget statement on child poverty and inequality.
  • The reversal of public health cuts to ensure universal early years services, including health visiting and school nursing, are prioritised and supported financially, with additional targeted help for children and families experiencing poverty.
  • The reversal of cuts to universal credit which will leave the majority of families claiming this benefit worse off.

Download full report (PDF, 1.1 MB) or read summary here.